Perfect Moments

There are times in our lives that are simply perfect, moments where we hold our breath for fear of disturbing what is happening around us.  These times are rare, fleeting, but they nourish us and make us stronger.

Such was the case a few nights ago, when I was standing on a beach in Hawaii photographing the most beautiful sunset that I have ever seen.  A gentle breeze drove away the heat, music played in the background, my daughter swam in the ocean and I was doing what I love…. making photographs.

When the light was gone my daughter and I stayed a little bit longer, looking out onto the dark ocean and listening to the waves.  

It was perfect.

I am back from this trip now, back to the world of photo editing, writing, podcasts and workshops.  I look forward to sharing much more with all of you very soon.

Finding peace at the water’s edge

Life is an amazing journey:  We experience epic highs, crushing lows and of course all things in between.  Life moves so fast, and it is important to hit the pause button every now and then so we can celebrate successes and contemplate those times when we need to adjust course.

When I need to hit pause, I almost always gravitate to the water’s edge.  There is something so peaceful about sitting or walking along the edge of a river or ocean, camera in hand, completely alone in my thoughts.  Sometimes I am taking the time to quietly celebrate a success, sometimes I am taking the time to work through something that I am struggling with and other times, I am simply tweaking plans to continue working towards my goals.  Artistically, I have no photographic expectations when I am out along the water:  it isn’t a wedding, it isn’t a portrait session and it isn’t a day on the street.  Sometimes I get a photograph that I love and sometimes I don’t even click the shutter.  I always, however, benefit from taking the time to be alone with my thoughts.  To be honest, I think we can all benefit from doing this more often.

Over the years I have gathered hundreds of images while out along the water.  One day I’m sure I will edit them down into a cohesive series, but for now I’d just like to share a small handful of these images.

I hope you like them.

I would love to know what you do, or where you go, when you want to get away and think.  Please let me know in the comments below if you feel like sharing.

Until next time!

Ian

Photographing New York City from the Top of the Rock

dscf1103-1

New York is a beautiful city.  It is immense, exciting, vibrant and at times overwhelming.  As a photographer it can often be hard to capture the enormity of a place like New York, and one of the best ways to do this is to find an elevated platform to shoot from.  Thankfully these platforms are common in many major cities:  Vancouver has the Lookout.  Seattle has the Space Needle.  London has the Shard.  Paris has Montparnasse Tower, the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame and the Arc De Triomphe.  These platforms provide the photographer with  great options to see and photograph the beauty and grandeur of a city.

New York City offers us two main viewing platforms:  The Empire State Building and the Top of the Rock (found atop Rockefeller Center).  Like the Eiffel Tower in Paris, many people choose to go up to the top of the Empire State Building because it is so iconic.  The viewing platform at the top of the Empire State Building is a great experience, one not to be missed, but when you make a city skyline shot of New York City you want the Empire State Building IN your photograph!

The Top of the Rock is located atop 30 Rockefeller Center, occupying the 67th, 69th, and 70th floors of the tower.  The 67th and 69th floors have outdoor terraces surrounded by transparent safety glass, while the 70th floor is completely open air.  The experience is curated extremely well for photographers, however, as there are slits cut in the safety glass that you can position your lens through.  Tripods are not allowed, but it is easy enough to brace yourself against the railings or glass to stabilize your camera.  There are no time limits or restrictions on how long you can stay, allowing you to arrive early before sunset and shoot well into blue hour.

Before we get started talking about an evening spent shooting the New York City skyline I’d like to mention that this blog post is part 5 of a 5 part series featuring photography from New York City:

With that said, let’s get started…

When I go to the top of one of these viewing platforms I try to time it so I am on deck 60-90 minutes before sunset.  I feel this provides me with the best opportunity to capture a variety of interesting images because I can shoot through the changing light from sunny blue sky, through the sunset, into the post sunset blue hour, and finally deep into night.  These are popular places though,  and they often have long lines so it is best to pre-purchase your tickets if you can and arrive early to leave yourself plenty of time to find your spot and start shooting.

dscf1044-2

When I arrived at the top deck this was the view I first saw.  It is an amazing skyline that puts the Empire State Building on full display, but also has the Brooklyn Bridge, Freedom Tower, and the Statue of Liberty in the background.  It is everything you would want to see in a New York City skyline shot, and I knew it was only going to get better as the light changed.

This photo is taken looking to the south, but you can walk almost all the way around the viewing deck so I wandered over to the north side to see what the view looked like.  It was quite nice too:

dscf0992-3

Looking north from the Top of Rock gives us a commanding view of Central Park.  I loved this view, grabbed a few images, but quickly realized that the money shot I was after was definitely going to be taken looking south.

Both of these photos were taken with the Fujinon 10-24mm f/4 lens on a Fuji X-Pro2.  This is the equivalent of 15-36mm on a full frame camera, and is a perfect focal length to capture skyline shots like this.  If you have a wide angle lens and are coming to places like this you definitely want to bring it.  Don’t despair if you don’t have a wide angle lens, however, as you can always shoot 2 or 3 frames with a 35mm or equivalent lens and stitch them together in post.

I knew I had an hour or so before the sunset was going to look its best, so I put the Fujinon 55-200mm telephoto lens on my camera and started looking around.  I already had a few frames of the city skyline with a beautiful blue sky behind it, and nothing was going to change until sunset.  To fill the time I love to put on a telephoto lens and start hunting around the city.  I’m looking for interesting compositions, interesting architecture, little detail shots.  Working your way around a city with long glass while you are waiting for the sunset is a great way to spend some time, and I was able to grab a few frames like these:

dscf1048-4

dscf1079-7

dscf1047-5

dscf1081-8

dscf1078-6

I especially enjoy shooting these detail shots as sunset approaches and the beautiful golden light comes in from the side of the frame.

The sunset this evening was truly beautiful, with the sky erupting in colour as the sun got lower and lower.   Remember to keep shooting through these changes.  Always edit when you are on your computer, not while you are in the moment.  You are better to keep shooting through the changing light and give yourself as many options as possible in post.    Here are a few frames as the sunset progressed this evening:

dscf1075-9

dscf1082-1

dscf1103-1

Now, there is always a period that happens once the sunset is fading where I slow my shooting down for a bit.  The sky often still looks beautiful during this time, however there are few lights on in the buildings so the photograph looks unbalanced to me.   Here is an example of what I am talking about:

dscf1121-12

Those city lights will come up though, and your sky will keep getting darker and darker which saturates the rich blues.  There will then be a short period of time where the city lights will balance with the sky, and you can grab a frame or two like these:

dscf1106-11

dscf1241-13

This is definitely when the no tripod rule can come become “a thing”.  There is a very low quantity of light during the few minutes where everything is balanced like this, and you really need a tripod to capture these scenes properly.

In lieu of having a tripod, however, there are a few things you can do:

  1. Use stabilized lenses.  The image stabilization in the Fujinon lenses I use easily buy me another 3-5 stops of shutter speed when I have to shoot hand held in low light.
  2. Crank your ISO!  Sure, it would be perfect if we could always expose these images at ISO 100 or 200 to maximize how clean our file is but we usually need tripods to do this.  In lieu of that, use your ISO to maintain an acceptable shutter speed to prevent image blur.  I am very comfortable shooting at ISO 1600 or 3200 with my Fuji cameras if I have to.
  3. Have clean technique:  Elbows in and braced.  Proper breathing when you take a shot.  Brace against something.
  4. Use your camera’s timer to trip the shutter, so you don’t shake the camera by pushing the button.

One final important thing many people forget is to put the camera down when it gets much darker than this.  Once your blue hour is gone you already have the great photos in the bank in my opinion, so just take the time to enjoy everything with your eyes.  Breath it all in.  It is magical to see a city at night like this.

Once you are back on your computer at home, edit through your images with a critical eye.  Maybe you shot 100 or 200 frames.  Keep 10 or 15.  Learn to edit your work to only keep your best frames.  From the 2 or 3 hours I spent atop the Top of the Rock I will probably add 2, maybe 3, images to my travel portfolio.  Work hard in the field to give yourself a lot of options, then edit and edit to the point where you are only showing your best work.

For me, I think this was my favourite image from the shoot:

dscf1103-1

I love the colours, and I love the dichotomy of old and new that you can see with the Empire State Building in the front, the brand new Freedom Tower in the middle, and the classic Statue of Liberty in the back of the frame.

IN CLOSING…

With a little pre-trip research and a bit of time you can almost always leave a city with a trophy skyline shot that will look beautiful on your wall at home.  I have to say though that as much as I love capturing an image that I am happy with, I especially love the process we have talked about in this blog post:  Getting to the destination, exploring my options, finding my shot (or shots), and then patiently shooting through the changing light.  It is a perfect way to spend a few hours.

I hope you enjoyed this series from New York City.  It is a remarkable place to spend time as a photographer, and should definitely be on everyone’s list if you love photographing cities.

Until next time!

Cheers,

Ian