406 Days With the Fuji X100F

406 days ago my friends at Fujifilm asked me if I would like to be one of 50 Official Fuji X Photographers to beta test the new (at the time) Fuji X100F.

390 days ago the camera arrived.

12,942 frames later, I am still shooting 90% of my personal work with the X100F.  I simply love this camera.

Over the past few years I have worked with pre-production models of many Fuji products but, as a long time X100 series user, this was the camera that I was really looking forward to.  I, like many others, have tried to put into words what it is about this camera that inspires me so much; but to be honest, I still can’t.  The X100 series, and especially the X100F, really is the embodiment of the phrase “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts”.  I am very fortunate to also own an X-T2 and an X-Pro2, both incredibly capable cameras, but it is the X100F that I always reach for first unless I have a specific need for one of the other cameras.

Two years ago I wrote an article entitled, “What’s next for the Fuji X100T?”, in which I shared my wish list for the successor to that camera.  Earlier this year Fuji not only delivered, but surpassed everything that I had hoped for (other than weather sealing).  As I sit here, contemplating what I would love to see in the successor to the Fuji X100F, the truth is that the list is pretty small as the “F” ticks all of the boxes for me (key words:  “for me”).  Yes, I would like to see weather sealing come to the next generation of this camera, but I can also say that I have shot in rain with the X100F many times and have not had any problems.  I would like the ability to select the number of film simulations I can bracket (I usually only want two), and I would like to be able to save a RAW file alongside an Advanced Filter image.  Sure, we could always use faster autofocus, but there is nothing in this camera that is a barrier to creating the work I see in my head.   On the contrary, there is something elusive about it that inspires me to go out and make new work.  As many others have said before me:  this is definitely my desert island camera.

As I reflect back on this past year in my photographic life, I’d like to share two dozen images taken with the Fuji X100F (some that were posted in previous articles and some that haven’t been posted before).  The versatility of this camera never ceases to amaze me and I can’t wait to see what Fuji does next.

Do you shoot with an X100 series camera?  If so I’d love to hear your thoughts about it in the comments below!

Cheers,

Ian

 

Los Angeles street photography with the Fuji X100F – Part two

Note: This is part two of a two part series featuring street photography from a recent trip to Los Angeles. To view part one click HERE.

As I was getting everything together for this article I happened to look back on my blog posts for this year and was surprised to see how much street photography I have posted.  I consider myself a candid and documentary photographer, which to me is an encompassing term that includes my street work, my travel work, my candid wedding photography and of course the education I provide.  In previous years, I put a lot of effort into ensuring that I always presented a balanced mix from the above genres on this site, but in 2017 there has definitely been more of a focus on new gear and street photography.  I think this is a direct result of something that I read late last year:

“Just be. Let your true nature emerge. Don’t disturb your mind with seeking.”

When I first read this I interpreted it to mean, in the context of my photography, that I should allow myself the space to shoot whatever speaks to me right now (client work notwithstanding of course) and to spend 2017 allowing my creativity and my vision to guide my work.  I think it is important for photographers to seek out new knowledge, but I also think it is important sometimes to step back and let your creativity guide you at times too.  This is what I have been focusing on his year.

I am planning upcoming trips to Europe and California in the fall which will provide a lot of new travel content for this site, but the truth is that when I am left to my own devices street photography speaks to me more than anything else right now.  It isn’t a new genre for me, I have always shot it, but this year it is giving me so much satisfaction as an artist.  I don’t need anything but my camera and a good pair of shoes.  I can shoot it almost anywhere, at anytime, with little to no planning.  It is the antithesis of much of the client driven work I produced for years and I know the gains I make on the street this year are benefiting all of the other aspects of my photography too.

And, to be a street photographer who has the opportunity to travel often to places like Los Angeles? It is an amazing thing.

So, with that said, here is part two of my LA street photography series from my recent family trip in March.  As I mentioned in part one of this series, my shooting time was very limited on this trip, so all of the images in both parts of this series are much more spur of the moment shots than I usually take.

In my next blog post I will be writing about the process of editing a body of work for a small gallery showing Fujifilm asked me to do.  Stay tuned!

Cheers,

Ian

Seattle, the Fuji X-Pro2, street photography, a chance encounter

“Is that a film camera?”

That’s how it started, asked as I was taking a photo of a gentleman walking down the street by Pike Place Market.

“Sort of”, I replied, showing him the photo that I just took on the back of the camera. “It’s the Fujifilm X-Pro2.  It’s all digital, but it has the soul of a film camera.”

“Nice pic, that looks just like Acros film”.

“It is”, I replied with a smile.

His name is Steve.  He is in his sixties and shoots street photography with a film Leica camera, in full manual of course.   I told him he looked just like the actor Sam Elliott.  He told me he got that a lot.  He had a hilarious mix of dry sarcasm and “crankiness”, but clearly was a man with decades of experience looking through a viewfinder.

We talked for about 20 minutes, during which he said so many pearls about photography and life that I can’t remember them all.  He spoke a lot about the “young kids” who are out shooting today and how they complicate photography.  There was a bit of the “back in my day” tone, I definitely didn’t agree with everything he said, but he shared his ideas with such conviction and passion that it was enjoyable just to listen.  At one point he said:

“Photography can be as simple or complex as you chose to make it”

and

“Photography can be intellectual, instinctive, or both”

I asked him what he meant by these statements and he told me that he has gone through many different phases in his life.  When he was new, he instinctually took photos for fun because he “didn’t know any better”.  Then he went through a phase where he over thought everything.  He got obsessive, he read every book on photography he could find, he over analyzed photos, he shot relentlessly, etc.  He said that in hindsight he was glad he went through this phase because it helped him grow, but then quickly added, “I was a total ass to be around though”.  He followed that up by saying he just shoots instinctively now;  he loves walking in “his city”, he loves meeting people and he is happy if he occasionally makes a frame that he really likes.  It’s like he went full circle.

Right around that time my phone announced that I had a new message, which launched us into a conversation about “kids and their damn phones”.

(For the record:  I’m in my forties, but it was nice to be called a kid)

I can’t remember his exact wording, but it was something like this:

“The problem with the internet and many of today’s photographers is that they worry way too much about what other photographers are doing.  Just worry about what you are doing.”

This stood out to me, as it speaks to the obsession that some photographers seems to have with other photographers.   It sometimes feels like pluralism is dying in the photography industry:  People have strong beliefs on what makes for a good photograph or a good camera, but it seems harder and harder to find people who realize that those strong beliefs are merely that:  their beliefs, their opinions, their points of view.

Steve’s whole point was that we should stop worrying about all of that and just spend more time making ourselves happy by taking photos.  I’d love to say that we were really bonding by this point in the conversation, but this actually when things turned against me.  Steve asked me what I spent most of my photographic time doing, to which I replied “I shoot, edit, process, share, talk to other photographers, teach, write, blog, Instagram, Tweet, etc”.

(Crickets chirped for a minute… and it is usually only my wife who looks at me with such disapproval)

He thought for a moment, shrugged his shoulders, and finally said:

“Well, just make sure you’re focused on your own art.  Make yourself happy… the rest is all bullsh*t.”

I’m not sure what he meant by “the rest”, but with that he moved on down the street and so did I… just another one of those chance encounters that happen when we spend time on the streets.

Now, do I agree with everything he said?  Of course not.  Clearly I love social media and can say, with absolute certainty, that it has been instrumental in my success and even more importantly it has brought me many new friendships that I truly value.  But, hidden in his strongly worded opinion was an important message:  Do YOUR thing.  Make YOU happy…. whatever that looks like.

For the rest of the day I took a few good photos, stumbled across (and into) a Black Lives Matter rally, met a few new friends, booked two new clients via the magic of the internet, ate some good food and spent some time sitting by the water. It was very much a Ferris Bueller kind of day for me (look it up kids), which also served as a reminder that we can either get carried along by life or we can learn to set the pace.

I thought a lot about Steve’s messaging that day.  More and more I am coming to believe that the main thing stopping people from being happy and living the life they want to live is fear, which reminds me of this quote from Steve Jobs:

“Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Almost everything–all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure–these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.”

As depressing as this quote is there is so much truth to it. I look around me at the people who are truly living their lives and they all, to the last person, took conscious control of their own destiny. They don’t argue about the little things, they don’t worry about what everyone else is doing, they simply value the important things and are consistently and mindfully living the life that they want to live.

I went to Seattle for some photos and food, but came back with my mind racing with new ideas.  Life is funny sometimes.

And, to wrap this up, why did this conversation even happen in the first place?  Because Fujifilm took a chance six years ago and brought us the amazing X100… the camera that changed everything for so many of us.  Years later, Steve saw an X series camera around my neck and asked me a question about it.  So, with that said, I think it is fitting to end this post with a new series of images I made that weekend, all shot with the Fujifilm X-Pro2, the 23mm f/2 and the new 50mm f/2.

Cheers,

Ian