A Winter in Monochrome

It feels like a long dark winter is coming to an end, doesn’t it?  Coming to an end literally, as winter turns to spring this month, but also coming to an end metaphorically in the context of the pandemic.  We are still struggling with the virus here in Canada of course, but we are also seeing small glimmers of hope:  A 4th vaccine was just approved for use here, and when I talk to people I feel a shift from the endless fatigue of the past year to a building sense of cautious optimism.  Day after day, more and more, I hear people using the word “soon”.

Soon we can hug our loved ones that we haven’t seen in a year.

Soon we can travel to those places we love and miss dearly.

Soon we can go to a live performance and sit with fellow fans, rejoicing in the joy that art brings to our lives.

Soon we can see each other’s smiles again.

Just…. soon.

We have a little way to go yet my friends, but hold the line for just a few more months.  I look forward to meeting new friends, seeing old ones, waking up to the sounds of a new city and creating the work that I love to make again.

Soon.

This winter I’ve been spending time along a dike system that is near my home.  My Fujifilm X100V is always with me of course, and all winter I have had it set to produce contrasty black and white images (using the Acros+R film simulation).  I did try shooting in colour here and there, but monochrome just felt right. 

Here are a few images from those walks… I hope you like them.

Cheers,

Ian

The Injury Chronicles – Part One: The Streets of Toronto

You may have noticed that I haven’t posted many new articles lately.  It isn’t because of lack of content;  I’ve currently only edited personal work up to July so I still have a lot of new work to share.  It is, rather, that I am rehabilitating a hand injury that has become a roadblock to shooting, typing, and playing guitar.  You know, just the main things I do to make a living and for personal enjoyment.  🙂

Having something small get in the way of my work (like a hand injury) was frustrating at first.  There is always a silver lining though, and I have come to appreciate this quiet period of time away from the creative process.  I am viewing this break as an opportunity to be with family, to re-charge as a person and to get inspired by the world around me again.  I’ve been making notes, conceptualizing ideas, storyboarding projects, and I’m excited by the possibilities once I have full use of my hand again.  People often have a fear of missing out on things or of falling behind, but the truth is that breaks are good.

…and in the meantime?

Well, I have a lot of photo essays sitting on my computer that I haven’t posted yet.  They are random and diverse, and I’m going to use this opportunity to post several of them over the next few weeks.  We will start today with a collection of new images from the Toronto street photography workshop that I taught this past July

I hope you like them!

Cheers,

Ian

Saturday | Departure | 7,930 Kilometres To Home

Paramedicine was a dangerous job, the streets unpredictable, but to know true danger you really just need to take a cab ride to Charles de Gaulle Airport.  Last year was the worst, with our driver literally falling asleep multiple times on the highway at the end of a long night spent ferrying revellers home after France won the World Cup.   Lightening doesn’t strike twice though, right?  Well, as it turns out, sometimes it does.  My driver didn’t fall asleep this time thankfully, but he did set new land speed records through the use of… creative… lane changes.

I think I might just walk to the airport next year.

I was excited though, despite the ride, because airports always inspire me to make new photographs.  There is something magical about the way light and shadow bounce through a terminal,  due to the glass architecture and design.  

I had a 2 hour wait, so I made photos until we boarded (see images below).  As I settled in for the 10 hour flight home I had time to reflect on the past week.  How lucky am I?   I lead an amazing life, full of travel and time spent with wonderful students, and now I get to spend time at home with my family.  Balance, right?  And gratitude.  A LOT of gratitude.

I hope you enjoyed this eight part series documenting a week spent teaching in Paris (click here to go to the first post).  Looking forward, there are a few things coming up on this site that I am incredibly excited  to share with you.

Until next time,

Ian

To view the previous post click here